Products We Have Designed and Manufactured Over Our 20+ Year History

There is no way we could possibly do justice to all the products, and all the projects, LBM has been used for since we first invented this technology.   What we can do, is showcase one of the more interesting applications: LBM mirrors for space and measurement applications.  This should allow just about anyone to understand just how broadly this technology has been applied, and just how much more potential it still has.  Not just in Aerospace, but in all sorts of manufacturing.
 
This is not the end. It is just the beginning!  It will probably take another 20-30 years before LBM Technology even begins to scratch the surface of it's full market potential.
  1. TWO LAYER MICROPERF LBM IN STAINLESS
    TWO LAYER MICROPERF LBM IN STAINLESS
    This is the smallest practical scale of LBM. MicroPerf is punch perforated from thin sheet steel in two geometries. One of the sheets is then corrugated. Finally alternating layers of flat and corrugated sheets are welded together at the nodes. At this scale LBM can be approximately compared to sheet metal. Test on folding and forming of MicroPerf have shown that it can be pressed, punched, and formed in much the same way as sheet metal. There are critical differences that have to be adjusted for, but nothing so technically challenging as to pose a serious obstacle to mass production. Work on this vein of LBM research remains unfinished. We suspect MicroPerf has great market potential. Realizing this potential would take a sizable investment. Prohibitively so.
  2. REVERSE SIDE OF SATELLITE MIRROR
    REVERSE SIDE OF SATELLITE MIRROR
    This picture shows the design of the Lattice that allows the mirror to remain perfectly flat through temperature fluctuations ranging from minus 600 to plus 1200 Degrees F. The geometry of LBM is extremely stiff, and it resists both thermal and mechanical deformation. You can also see the design features on the back. The threaded hols for mounting are in circular "hard points" designed into the casting. There are three mounting screws that connect the mirror to various types of hardware and adapters. This allows the same mirror to be used on many different satellites. The six tabs at the edges are also for mounting. But they are generally not used in space. They are needed for testing and quality assurance purposes.
  3. LATTICE BLOCK MIRROR IS SO FLAT THE MIRROR SURFACE IS ALMOST INVISIBLE
    LATTICE BLOCK MIRROR IS SO FLAT THE MIRROR SURFACE IS ALMOST INVISIBLE
    Laser radar scanning machines are used to scan large aircraft into a computer duding assembly. The mirrors are placed above, below, and behind the aircraft so that the scanner can "see" the entire plane from one spot. Before they began using our mirrors the scanner had to be moved three times to scan the whole object, which introduced error into the data set. The mirrors eliminated this source of error and greatly improved manufacturing accuracy. It is necessary to scan the aircraft as it is being built. For example, to ensure that one wing does not come out longer than the other, and that both wings are exactly positioned with respect to the fuselage. Using a fixed set up, with one scanner and many mirrors, helps Boeing assemble 747s better than the old multiple scan procedure.